Thanksgiving Dos and Don’ts

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Thanksgiving is the kickoff to the holiday season. It’s a time for family and fun. However, often times Thanksgiving can be paired with last minute stress and family feuds. Luckily, we’ve created a list of Do’s and Don’ts for this Thanksgiving.

DO: Arrive on time.

If an invite states 5pm dinner, you should be prepared to sit down and eat at 5pm. The worst is waiting for people to still arrive when the food is fresh out of the oven. Arriving late is can be inconsiderate to the host and other guests. If you anticipate being more than 10 minutes late, best to call or text your host if possible.

DON’T: Arrive early.

The host needs that extra half hour to finish getting the house ready, and trying to entertain a guest while setting the table, and testing the turkey really isn’t a good look.

DO: Be thankful.

It is THANKSgiving after all. If you’re a guest, bring a little something and be sure to thank the host for all the time slaving away in the kitchen. If you’re the host, accept gifts graciously, accept compliments on the meal (everyone is their worst critic, but guess what? Guests won’t notice unless you point it out!), and accept help cleaning up afterwards. It’s only fair; you did the majority of the cooking after all.

DON’T: Be rude.

It is important to be considerate.  If you’re counting calories, don’t announce it. It only stresses out the other guests, and you know full well what kind of food is served at a Thanksgiving dinner. If you have an allergy, ask beforehand what kind of food will be served. By the same token, if you don’t like something, don’t eat it. There’s no need to be pushing it around on your plate for all to see.

DO: Engage in conversation.

It may have been a while since the family got together, so it’s always nice to catch up. Some lighthearted dinner conversations could include; the food, movies, travels, and even family.

DON’T: Use Thanksgiving as a time to push your ideas.

The family dinner table is not a time to be discussing politics, scandals, or a child’s report card. Occasionally, these topics can lead to an uncomfortable atmosphere for all parties involved.

DO: Invite friends and new neighbors.

Being the new kid doesn’t get any easier the older you get, especially if you are moving into a neighborhood around the holidays. Amidst unpacking and figuring out directions to the nearest grocery store, the holidays can easily sneak up on us. Be kind, and extend an offer to the new neighbors down the street. In a similar manner, young adults may have family in another state and may not be able to go home for Thanksgiving. This is especially true if they are saving up for a flight home come winter break, so be sure to extend the offer to your young adult and single friends as well.

DON’T: Overbook Thanksgiving.

As a host, be resourceful about who you invite into your humble abode, while keeping in mind that you only have one turkey that feeds 10. Trying to rearrange seating and plates can be an added hassle that no one wants to deal with on Thanksgiving.

DO: Manage your time.

As a guest, visiting a couple families on Thanksgiving is not out of the ordinary. Although overwhelming, it is important to manage your time. Each family has individual traditions, and has worked tirelessly for a fantastic Thanksgiving meal. Therefore, it is important to mingle and stay awhile. After all, nobody likes a dine and dash.

DON’T: Overbook yourself.

It is easy to get caught up in all the running around from house to house. However, it is more important to enjoy yourself and your company rather than doing everything. Just thinking about it gets tiring.

DO: Get some shut eye.

It’s easy to get pulled in to all the excitement surrounding the holidays. However, trying to make a full Thanksgiving dinner AND deal with the in-laws can tire anyone out. It is important to get a fully rested 8 hours of sleep prior to the big day. One way, is to sleep on a Tanda mattress. Guaranteed to make you fall asleep fast, and stay asleep.

 

 

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