Sleep Talking

Somniloquy: to sleep talk, or not to sleep talk? That is the question. Simply put, somniloquy is a sleep disorder that involves unconscious talking during sleep, or sleep talking. Though mysterious, and sometimes off putting, sleep talking is actually a pretty common occurrence. Roughly 67% of adults have reported talking in their sleep at least once in the past three months.

Generally, sleep talking is nothing to worry about. It ranges from mumbling gibberish, to full coherent sentences. Sleep talking can be completely random or brought on by someone else talking to them while they are asleep. The voice may even sound a bit different from the person’s waking voice.  The content can vary from completely random, or relating to past or present experience. Understanding these words may be difficult and perhaps not even necessary, because it happens outside of conscious awareness. So anything you say in the middle of the night can’t be held against you. Although, not harmful, sleep talking can be embarrassing for the person, or annoying to other bed inhabitants.

Some things that cause these nocturnal outbursts to become more frequent include insufficient sleep, alcohol or drug use, illness, stress, anxiety, and depression. So if you have done any of these recently, don’t be surprised if some sleep talking ensues.

However, be mindful. Sometimes sleep talking is a sign of another sleep disorder, such as sleep apnea, night terrors, or sleepwalking. So if you are consistently waking up tired, or feel sad often, it is important to consult with your doctor about your sleep talking.

See this fun video by Adam Rosenberg of himself sleep talking

Myth Busting Napping

If you’re like me, you rediscovered your love for naps in college when your schedule was a bit haphazard and you had a small chunk of time in the middle of the day. As an adult though, taking naps can be frowned upon and feel a little juvenile. Below we debunk some classic myths when it comes to napping and how it can actually be beneficial.

No Time to Cat Nap

If you have time to grab a coffee, a snack, and surf Facebook, you have time for a nap. Taking a 20 minute “power nap” helps to boost alertness.

Perfect Nap is 20 minutes

While 20 minutes is a power nap, there is also the 40 minute nap, the “replacement nap,” as well as the prophylactic nap, which means get into bed and sleep as long as you can. This is usually reserved for people who do shift work or those who are chronically sleep deprived. While this might seem like a great idea, we would like to mention that one person of the Tanda team took this kind of nap (by accident), slept until 8 p.m. and missed dinner with her family.

Usually the most beneficial nap is the power nap because it allows you to get enough sleep without getting the dreaded “sleep hangover” (this occurs when you take a nap longer than 20 minutes).

Napping ‘Till You Can’t Nap No More

Speaking of a sleep hangover, many people fear that they will sleep longer than intended. While technology in bed is frowned upon for nighttime sleeping, here it is your best friend. Use an alarm clock so you won’t over-nap.

Don’t Nap Too Close to Bed

This is actually true. Research shows that the ideal nap time is between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Here our circadian rhythm is at low energy levels and makes it easier to nap.

Bizarre Dreams, Party of 1

Napping puts you in a state between wakefulness and sleep or a “hypnagogic reverie.” In this state, you will have more lucid dreams and have you saying, “what a weird dream.”

All the Tabs in My Brain Won’t Close…and Where is that Music Playing From?

Ever felt like your brain was the Internet and you have 20 tabs open? (Raises hand). You aren’t alone and many people think they can’t nap because of this…but this isn’t true. The trick is consistency; take a nap at the same time every day for the same amount of time. Eventually, your brain will shut down and the music will magically stop playing.

Only Lazy People Nap

If lazy people weren’t actually so lazy and were reading this blog, they would be offended. Fortunately they aren’t but it doesn’t matter because to nap is to be human. History is littered with famous (and influential) people who espoused the benefits of napping. Don’t believe us? Take a nap and read this blog again, let us know how you feel.

Tired After Eating? There’s a Nap for That

Have you ever experienced that after lunch sleepy feeling? If so, don’t worry, it is completely normal as it is natural for people to want to sleep about 7 hours after waking up. Also, this is just your body’s natural reaction to digestion; the body requires and utilizes energy to digest. Another reason is due to the amount of insulin produced after certain meals, such as sugary foods, that can trigger sleep hormones. Overeating is another factor–eating too much can make the body feel uncomfortable, so listen to your body, and stop eating once you’re full.

How to avoid the dreaded after lunch tiredness:

Don’t Skip Breakfast

  • Breakfast is truly the most important meal of the day. Aside from providing nutrients and giving your body a kick start, it also reduces tiredness later in the day. If you’ve had a good breakfast, it will be easier to ignore those break room donuts.

Eat Smaller Meals throughout the Day

  • Smaller meals take less time to digest. Therefore, the body will use less energy to digest and more to tackle the day ahead.

Drink Water

  • Water is the answer to everything! Water keeps the body hydrated, and dehydration can make the body feel sluggish and fatigued.

Go Outside

  • Exercise keeps you alert and the sunlight increases happiness. During lunch, it can be beneficial to get outside and go for a short walk. Exercise keeps the blood circulating and minimizes the risk of an after lunch food coma.

Take a Nap

  • Although naps sometimes represent laziness, it wouldn’t hurt to take a 20-minute power nap. It is scientifically proven that power naps help boost brain activity as well as productivity.

 

 

Results are in…

Does the Tanda mattress really work? It claims cool, but does it deliver? Here at Tanda, we put this to the test using thermal imaging software so you can see the difference. The Seek ThermalTM camera measures temperature and displays the varying levels of heat using a color coding system.  This was the perfect tool, not only to see the level of heat retention on a Tanda but how it would fare against a mattress competitor.   On the left you can see one test subject lying down on the competitor mattress, while on the right another subject is lying down on the Tanda mattress.

You will notice that the subject on the left is slightly heavier than the subject on the right. This would lead the viewer to assume that the subject on the left would emit more body heat. However, as the video goes on and the two subjects lay on the beds, you can see a visible shift in color.  This shows that no matter what the body size, our bodies naturally expel heat particularly when we come in contact with another surface.  After fifteen minutes of laying on the mattresses, both subjects get up and you can clearly see the difference in the amount of heat retention that is on the mattress. The Tanda mattress stays cool (indicated with the blue and green color) while the competitor mattress gets hot from the heat emitted from the body (indicated with yellow and orange color).

The new Tanda mattress  pulls cool air from the surrounding room and transfers it directly to the body, keeping you cool all night long. After a thermal test, the answer is clear, Tanda is one cool mattress!

The results were quite clear that the Tanda was far cooler and retained much less heat than a competitor.

For additional information, check out this study on the importance of staying cool at bedtime.

 

 

Sleep Positions

Did you know that how you sleep in bed says a lot about you? Learn about it below

  1. Fetus

The most popular position where people sleep in a curled-up manner. Women are twice as likely to sleep like this and said it was their most common sleep position. They are said to have a tough exterior but still sensitive, appearing shy but warming up quickly.

  1. Log

Sleep on your side with both arms down? You are a social, easy going person who is trusting but sometimes to the point of being gullible so watch out! Continue reading Sleep Positions

How to Sleep with Sunburn

Sunburn occurs when we are overexposed to ultraviolet (UV) light, which causes our skin to not only appear red but become swollen that is hot to the touch. In addition, it can be painful, tight, and itchy, and severe burns can cause even more symptoms like headaches, fever, and chills, making it even more difficult to fall asleep.

Now while the first thing to do once you are burned is to get out of the sun, here are some tips to help you feel a little better, and maybe a bit better rested.

Moisturize

  • We’re not just talking about lotion here; after a cool shower, pat your skin and apply some aloe vera (moisturizer with vitamins A and E work as well)—it is both moisturizing and cooling. Helpful tip when looking for and applying aloe vera, find one that is 100% and chill it in the refrigerator for some extra cool relief.

Drink Plenty of Water

  • This might seem like an obvious one but it is important. Sunburn draws fluid to the skin, increasing your chances for dehydration so drinking plenty of water throughout the day tends to be a good idea.

Wear Loose, Breathable Clothing

  • Wearing constrictive clothing can cause you more pain so it generally helps to wear clothing made from cotton.

Apply Hydrocortisone

  • If you have itchy, swollen skin, hydrocortisone will definitely help relieve those symptoms and they come in convenient applications such as ointments, creams, sprays, and lotions.

Take an Aspirin or Ibuprofen

  • These anti-inflammatory medications can help to reduce swelling, redness, and discomfort. (Follow the label for all directions and side effects when taking this medication).

Don’t Rub Ice on Your Skin

  • We get it, you’re hot, ice is cold, and it should cool you down. But don’t do it! Putting an ice cube on the sunburnt part of your skin can cause more damage. Experts say to stick to a cool bath or shower or a cool compress to help reduce the pain.

Got any more helpful tips and tricks? Leave it in the comments below!