Thriving in a 9 to 5 World as a Night Owl

If you tend to function best at night, you might find it rough to navigate the 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. world designed for so-called “morning people.” The most caffeinated beverage and delicious breakfast pastries cannot alleviate that groggy, disorienting feeling that night owls feel in the morning. Instead of crawling your way back to bed, try these tips in the workplace to help you thrive.

Change Your Sleep Schedule

  • A gradual shift in your sleep pattern will make you feel more energetic during the day. As a night owl, you are used to going to bed late so start going bed earlier in smaller increments. Eventually you’ll get to an earlier bedtime.

Take Breaks

  • Staying late and waking up early usually leads to sleep loss and can cause procrastination in the workplace. Instead of trying to plow through your day, break your workload into smaller, more manageable tasks and take breaks in between each task.

Talk to a Doctor

  • If coping mechanisms and other tips aren’t helping and your night-owl habits are interfering with your lifestyle, talk to a doctor to make sure you don’t have a sleep disorder. Most people don’t recognize when they have a sleep disorder, so seeing a doctor could help answer some questions.

How Do You Sleep In Bed—Stomach, Side or Back?

Sleep.org ranked which way is the best to sleep from best to worst. How do you stack up?

  1. Back

Only 8% of people sleep on their back and it is still the best for you. According to research, sleeping on your back allows your body to remain in the neutral position with your head, neck, and spine in rest. No extra pressure means less pain. Downside of this position, it can cause your tongue to block the breathing tube, which can make snoring more severe and problematic for sleep apnea sufferers.

  1. Side

15% of adults sleep on their side where the spine is elongated and helps to diminish back and neck pain. With the airways open, you are also less likely to snore and it is a great choice for people with sleep apnea. One wrinkle, it can lead to them because half of your face is pushed into a pillow.

  1. Stomach

7% of adults sleep this way and the only thing this is good for is snoring and that’s about it. Sleeping this way causes back and neck pain, putting pressure on muscles and joints, leading to numbness, tingling, and a host of other issue. Their suggestion if you can only sleep this way, sleep with your forehead propped up on the pillow (instead of with your head turned to one side) to allow room to breathe.

 

Curious to know what it means if you sleep like a starfish or you and your partner nuzzle in bed? Learn about it here for singles and here for couples.

Sleepwalking

If you know someone who suffers from somnambulism you know a sleepwalker, which occurs in the deepest stage of sleep during the first few hours of sleep. That’s usually why you can’t snap sleepwalkers out of this state; they are too soundly asleep—having no recollection of events that occurred, even if pain was inflicted on them.

So what do you do if you live with a sleepwalker?

Gently guide the person back to bed and if this happens often, make sure the area around the bed is free of any obstacles or anything that can hurt the sleepwalker as they won’t wake up if any pain is inflicted upon them. A good precaution is to lock all the doors and windows before bed and hide the car keys.

If you are able to wake a sleepwalker from this state be careful because they are usually confused and groggy for a good 30 minutes and can lash out both verbally or physically. Children sleepwalk more than adults and if it does occur with adults, it is usually during the later stages of REM sleep and there could be an underlying issue (sleep disorder, side effect of medication, medical condition, etc.).

Sleep talking is also associated with sleepwalking but resist the urge to engage in conversation with a sleep talker. Sometimes it is nonsensical babble and other times it sounds like a normal conversation but most sleep talkers aren’t aware of what they are saying and won’t recall what they did say making you more frustrated.

Keeping a sleepwalking diary with details of when it occurred, how long it happened, and what happened will help you or a professional understand your issues and help create better sleep habits. Don’t have someone to take notes during your sleepwalking episodes? Some have resorted to setting up cameras to watch what they did at night the next day.

If you think you are a sleepwalker, please speak with a professional for tools to help you.

 

Avoid the Thanksgiving Food Coma

Thanksgiving Day, a time for football, family, and food! Many of us look forward to the endless supply of food. After eating all of it; you more than likely want to curl up on your side and not move until you have to go shopping the next day. Instead of being in a food coma, try these tips to help beat them this Thanksgiving.

Water, No Bubbles Please

Soda is carbonated and fills your stomach with air making you uncomfortable. Instead, stick to water, which will actually help to fill you up and slow down throughout the meal. Therefore, you won’t over consume and feel bloated halfway through your meal.

Veggies Please

It’s really easy to dive into the rich food sitting in front of you but opt for the healthier options first like cucumbers, white rice, and others. Avoid beans and broccoli to avoid the usual stomach aches and pains. By sitting near these foods, you are more likely to reach for them and not over indulge on the other delicious items.

Don’t Be Salty

Researchers say that on Thanksgiving, we consume close to 4,500 calories a day and adding salt to your meal is just going to make you feel more bloated.

Big Eyes, Small Plates

Not sure you can stop yourself from taking two or more of everything? Use smaller plates as it forces you to portion out smaller food and still feel full by the end of the meal.

Put the Fork Down

It takes 20 minutes for your brain to understand that your stomach is full and tell you to stop eating. Instead of approaching Thanksgiving meal like a Nathan’s hot dog eating contest, take it slow so you won’t feel uncomfortable by the end of the meal. Plus, you’ll have room for dessert!

Take a Walk

Walking helps to aid in the digestive process so grab the family and pets and take a leisurely stroll outside.

Pinkies Up

Tea helps to make it easier for food to pass through the stomach.

 

 

How do you beat the Thanksgiving Day food coma? Let us know in the comments below!

Thanksgiving Dos and Don’ts

Thanksgiving is the kickoff to the holiday season. It’s a time for family and fun. However, often times Thanksgiving can be paired with last minute stress and family feuds. Luckily, we’ve created a list of Do’s and Don’ts for this Thanksgiving.

DO: Arrive on time.

If an invite states 5pm dinner, you should be prepared to sit down and eat at 5pm. The worst is waiting for people to still arrive when the food is fresh out of the oven. Arriving late is can be inconsiderate to the host and other guests. If you anticipate being more than 10 minutes late, best to call or text your host if possible.

DON’T: Arrive early.

The host needs that extra half hour to finish getting the house ready, and trying to entertain a guest while setting the table, and testing the turkey really isn’t a good look.

DO: Be thankful.

It is THANKSgiving after all. If you’re a guest, bring a little something and be sure to thank the host for all the time slaving away in the kitchen. If you’re the host, accept gifts graciously, accept compliments on the meal (everyone is their worst critic, but guess what? Guests won’t notice unless you point it out!), and accept help cleaning up afterwards. It’s only fair; you did the majority of the cooking after all.

DON’T: Be rude.

It is important to be considerate.  If you’re counting calories, don’t announce it. It only stresses out the other guests, and you know full well what kind of food is served at a Thanksgiving dinner. If you have an allergy, ask beforehand what kind of food will be served. By the same token, if you don’t like something, don’t eat it. There’s no need to be pushing it around on your plate for all to see.

DO: Engage in conversation.

It may have been a while since the family got together, so it’s always nice to catch up. Some lighthearted dinner conversations could include; the food, movies, travels, and even family.

DON’T: Use Thanksgiving as a time to push your ideas.

The family dinner table is not a time to be discussing politics, scandals, or a child’s report card. Occasionally, these topics can lead to an uncomfortable atmosphere for all parties involved.

DO: Invite friends and new neighbors.

Being the new kid doesn’t get any easier the older you get, especially if you are moving into a neighborhood around the holidays. Amidst unpacking and figuring out directions to the nearest grocery store, the holidays can easily sneak up on us. Be kind, and extend an offer to the new neighbors down the street. In a similar manner, young adults may have family in another state and may not be able to go home for Thanksgiving. This is especially true if they are saving up for a flight home come winter break, so be sure to extend the offer to your young adult and single friends as well.

DON’T: Overbook Thanksgiving.

As a host, be resourceful about who you invite into your humble abode, while keeping in mind that you only have one turkey that feeds 10. Trying to rearrange seating and plates can be an added hassle that no one wants to deal with on Thanksgiving.

DO: Manage your time.

As a guest, visiting a couple families on Thanksgiving is not out of the ordinary. Although overwhelming, it is important to manage your time. Each family has individual traditions, and has worked tirelessly for a fantastic Thanksgiving meal. Therefore, it is important to mingle and stay awhile. After all, nobody likes a dine and dash.

DON’T: Overbook yourself.

It is easy to get caught up in all the running around from house to house. However, it is more important to enjoy yourself and your company rather than doing everything. Just thinking about it gets tiring.

DO: Get some shut eye.

It’s easy to get pulled in to all the excitement surrounding the holidays. However, trying to make a full Thanksgiving dinner AND deal with the in-laws can tire anyone out. It is important to get a fully rested 8 hours of sleep prior to the big day. One way, is to sleep on a Tanda mattress. Guaranteed to make you fall asleep fast, and stay asleep.

 

 

Couple’s Sleeping Positions

Sex positions are a thing, but have you heard of sleeping positions? This is the position that a couple will take while sleeping. It is subject to change throughout the night, but have you ever wondered what it means when your partner turns away from you while sleeping?  After all, a person can show true intentions when asleep and with their guard down. Here is a list of sleeping positions and what they mean for your relationship.

Cherish – back to back but touching

  • This position shows that you are both comfortable and relaxed in the relationship.

 

The Spoon – arguably the best utensil

  • One partner will take a protective stance over the other (can be interchanged)

 

The Liberty Lovers – back to back and not touching

  • This is the most common sleeping position. It shows trust, closeness, and independence.

 

The Tangle – true to its word, just a complete front-facing tangle

  • This position is more commonly seen in new relationships, as it showcases intense emotion. However, it also shows a higher level of dependency.

 

The Nuzzle – one person’s head is on the other’s chest

  • This position shows one partner nurturing and protecting the other.

 

The Leg Hug – entangled legs

  • This position depicts that your lives are completely intertwined. It also stands for a need for emotional or sexual connection.

 

The Space Hog – when one partner starfishes across the whole bed

  • This person tends to be selfish and dominant to a fault, so perhaps a conversation is in the works. It cannot be comfortable to sleep compressed on the edge of the bed.

 

Tired Driving

It’s no secret that lack of sleep takes a toll on your health, both mentally and physically. However, driving while tired is often overlooked. It’s the common misconception that you’re not that tired or you’re not that far away from your destination. This couldn’t be more wrong. Over time, individuals who regularly get 6 hours of sleep or less will find their reaction time has slowed to a quarter of a second to almost 4 seconds. Believe it or not, 4 seconds is all it takes to swerve off the road, hit someone, or run a red light. Continue reading Tired Driving